Acropolis - Southern Slope

This was the cultural center of ancient Athens, and is considered to be the first example of a complex of buildings dedicated to performances of the arts, whether in Greece or the world.

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Ancient Agora

This was the center of public life for the ancient Athenians.

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Olympieion

The Temple of Olympian Zeus was built by the Hellenophile Emperor, Hadrian (117-132 AD). This, the most monumental temple of its time, was dedicated to Zeus, the father of gods.

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Acropolis

One of the masterpieces of classical architecture.

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Hadrian's Arch

This was built by the Athenians in honor of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, who was a friend of the city of Athens. Hadrian himself passed under this glorious arch to attend the inauguration of the Temple of Olympian Zeus.

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Hadrian's Library

A rectangular building (122 x 82 m) built in 132 AD by the Roman emperor Hadrian. Seen from above, it comprised a peristyle courtyard (with a colonnade), with special rooms for keeping papyri and books, lecture halls, and so on.

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Hill of Areopagus

This hill is 115 meters high and was dedicated either to Ares, the god of war, or alternatively to the Ares, that is the Erinyes or Furies, the apotropaic goddesses of revenge who can be found in Aeschylus' Eumenides.

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Hill of the Nymphs - Pnyx

This is a 105 m hill that looks like an extension of the Hill of the Muses. From the end of the 6th century BC, it gradually came to be the official location for the meetings of the Athenian popular assembly.

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Lysicrates' Monument

This monument is the only choragic one that remains intact today, and it acts as an emblem of the whole Plaka district.

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Panathenaic Stadium

The Panathenaic Stadium or Kallimarmaro was built in 329 BC by the orator and administrator Lycurgus for the athletic competitions of Panathenaia (the major Athenian festival in honor of the patron goddess Athena).

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Roman Agora

The natural extension of the ancient Greek Agora, built in the second half of the 1st century BC, with donations from Julius Caesar and Augustus.

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Temple of Hephaestus

The highest point close to the Agora, on the site known in antiquity as Agoraios Kolonos, is dominated by the best preserved temple of classical antiquity, the temple of Hephaestus.

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Tower of the Winds

The Clock of Andronicus of Cyrrhus or Tower of the Winds is an intriguing structure that had a hydraulic mechanism.

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Kerameikos

This was the official cemetery of ancient Athens from the 11th century BC until the 2nd century AD. The area derived its name from the existence of many pottery or ceramic workshops around it.

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Hill of the Muses - Philopappou

This is an imposing hill, 147 m high, situated to the southeast of the Acropolis and once used as a sanctuary to the Muses (Mouseion).

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